Achievement House has an outstanding staff that is directly involved in developing our customized curriculum and teaching live online classes. We partner with other online education resources to offer students a range of courses that supplement and complement our courses. Click here to download our printable Program of Studies.


  • Department Requirement: Students are required to complete 4.0 credits in English, to include 1 course in Literature and an English course to be taken each school year, during grades 9-12. Students are placed in appropriate courses by their school counselor. Courses marked (*) meet the Literature requirement for this department.

    Core Classes

    Engage in an in-depth study of the American experience through a rich variety of literature from Native American writings to modern novels. Learn about the major writers and time periods, as well as the various periods of American literature and the ideas that shaped the writing of those times. Explore how various genres of writing and speaking transformed over time as the United States grew and cities were built. Learn to understand authors in relation to their historical settings, gather biographical information, and write literary essays, research papers, and personal responses. 
    Available Sections: Honors, CP

    This course is equivalent to a one semester college-level composition courses with an emphasis on expository, analytical,argumentative, personal and reflective writing on a variety of subjects. Learn to write effectively through rhetorical choices appropriate to audience, message, and medium. Teacher and peer writing feedback and revisions are a large component of the course. Emphasis is on vocabulary/diction, grammatical conventions, organization, and effective use of tone and voice to achieve desired goals of the compositions.

    This course is equivalent to a one-semester college-level course which engages in critical analysis of fiction. Students study representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on works of recognized literary merit. Critical analysis of literary works includes both social and historical perspectives so that students can reflect on multiple interpretations of literature. Students are strongly encouraged to read Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby over the summer months.

    Develop practical reading and writing skills for the workplace. Areas of focus include author’s perspective and craft choices in career- and goal-oriented fiction writing, structures of informational nonfiction writing, verbal and written communication, and persuasive writing. Explore how literature can help students make personal and career choices, and practice sharing information from research with others in an engaging way. Construct a personalized resume and cover letter. The capstone of the course is the development of a business proposal that solves a problem or meets a need selected by the student. This course is for seniors

    Develop an understanding of fictional works. Explore narrative structure and the impact that narrative elements have on not only the text but the reader as well. Study universal themes in literature and learn to compare texts.

    This course exposes students to both fiction and nonfiction works. Through the study of nonfiction, students explore ways in which literature serves as a vehicle for social change. A study of the drama genre allows students to consider questions of personal destiny and corruption of power. 

    This course prepares students for the Literature Keystone Exam. Students study word skills, vocabulary acquisition, narrative structures, figurative language, and dramatic and poetic elements. Students develop constructed response skills.

    Experience the cultures of the world through fiction, poetry, and memoirs. In this course, students read works from Africa, Japan, China, India, Latin America, and the Middle East to compare cultural perceptions of love and marriage, childhood, careers, and justice.
    Available Sections: Honors, CP

    Literature and Composition 1 - From Prose to Poetry: 1 credit — This course introduces students to a variety of reading and writing skills that will help them become familiar with literary terms, text structures, and reading strategies. Students learn how to develop their writing in response to the literature using narrative, argument, and informational writing. Selections include short stories, poems, nonfiction texts, and drama. Students begin to prepare for the Literature Keystone exam.
    Available Sections: Honors, CP, Career

     In this course, students finish preparing for the Literature Keystone exam. Students read novels and online texts to show mastery of literature standards for fiction and nonfiction. They apply critical reading and thinking skills to help analyze and evaluate texts. Students continue to develop writing skills in response to the literature.
    Available Sections: Honors, CP, Career 
    Prerequisite – Literature and Composition 1 - From Prose to Poetry

    This course is designed around the pillars of literacy. It prioritizes reading fluency, reading comprehension, vocabulary acquisition, and written expression. The course actively monitors a student’s progression as a reader and a writer.

    Electives

    Learn about the best ways to communicate in our digital world in order to share their thoughts and ideas. Explore some of the most popular types of writing such as narrative and argumentative. Students will have opportunities to respond using a variety of online media, such as blogs, forums, discussion boards, and images.

    In this writing-intensive course, students will be introduced to the major genres of writing, including nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. Through lessons, class discussions, and selected readings, students will learn about the elements of good writing. Students will build a variety of writing techniques and skills through both short- and long-term writing assignments.

     Learn techniques to format text and/or video to enhance their intended meaning. Complete a full cycle of the writing process, resulting in a published work in the form of a personal blog, podcast, or YouTube video after choosing from a list of teacher-approved projects such as a top 10 list, book, movie, game or TV show review, current event, opinion or editorial, memoir, or creative storytelling.
    Associated IA Pathway: AV Communication Arts

    This asynchronous course will look at fictional and non-fictional storytelling techniques, both written and visual, as well as how this genre influences modern media. Works will include memoirs, interpretative history, and more conventional fiction.

    Investigate the relationship between print and screen, using literary criticism to examine authors’ purpose in narrative and the cultural interpretation as it is transformed into an alternative media. 

  • Department Requirement: Students are required to complete 3.0 credits in Mathematics, to include 1 course in Algebra during grades 9-12. Students are placed in appropriate courses by their guidance counselor. Courses marked (*) meet the Algebra requirement for this department.

    Core Classes

    In this Pennsylvania Algebra I Keystone Exam aligned course, students are introduced to linear equations and inequalities in one variable, ratio and proportion, operations with radicals and radical functions, and exponents and exponential functions. The course concludes with the study of linear and quadratic functions, linear models, and graphs of linear equations and inequalities. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the Pennsylvania Algebra I Keystone exam at the conclusion of the course.
    Available Sections: Honors, CP

    Review the ideas and concepts taught in Algebra 1 and investigate advanced algebraic concepts including: quadratic equations, systems of equations, complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, matrices and determinants, polynomial functions, and radical functions and exponents. 

    Prerequisite – Algebra 1
    Available Sections: Honors, CP

    This course is designed to focus on building number concepts and problem solving skills in mathematics.  Topics covered in this course include: fractions and decimal numbers, variables, inequalities, algebraic patterns, algebraic expressions, algebraic rules and properties, introduction to algebraic equations, solving different kinds of algebraic equations, introduction to functions, and square roots and irrational numbers.  These topics are expended upon by learning how to calculate basic statistics, work with ratios and proportions, work with rates, understand percent, determine surface area and volume of three-dimensional shapes, measure angles, solve algebraic word problems, work with coordinate graphs, and identify nonlinear functions.  Students are required to take the Pennsylvania state assessed Algebra I Keystone at the end of this course.

    This course is equivalent to a one-semester college calculus course. Students are required to have and use a graphing calculator. Students work with functions represented in a variety of ways, determine limits of expressions, understand the meaning of a derivative in terms of a rate of change and local linear approximation, define the derivative of a function and find the derivative and integral of functions, apply differentiation techniques to the Theory of Extrema to sketch functions, solve related rates problems, optimization problems, and apply the Mean Value Theorem, understand the meaning of the definite integral, apply integration techniques to area between curves, volumes, length of curves, and average value of function, use trigonometric and algebraic substitutions, and solve differential equations. 

    Prerequisite – Pre-Calculus

    This course is designed to prepare students, who have successfully completed AP Calculus AB, for the BC level of the College Board Advanced Placement Exam. It is a college level course that covers material equivalent to a 2nd course in college calculus. This is a rigorous course which requires mastery and recall of all AP Calculus AB topics. 

    Prerequisite – AP Calculus AB

    This course is equivalent to a one-semester college course in statistics. This course is activity driven, with applications in gaming scenarios, population growth, and sports. Students perform exploratory analysis of data, making use of graphical and numerical techniques to study patterns, apply sampling techniques to estimate population statistics, anticipate patterns by producing models using probability and simulation, and make statistical inferences using appropriate models.  

    This course covers the second half of Algebra 1. This course focuses primarily on systems of linear equations and inequalities as well as exponents and polynomial expressions, and data analysis. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the Pennsylvania Algebra 1 Keystone exam at the conclusion of this course.

    This course is designed to focus on building number concepts and problem solving skills in mathematics. Topics covered in this course include: the concept of fractions and part-to-whole relationships, magnitude, equivalence, and the addition and subtraction of fractions, multiplication and division of fractions, working with mixed numbers, the concept of decimal numbers, operations on decimal numbers, understanding percent, integers, and operations on integers. These topics are expanded upon by learning how to use fraction models, measure angles, draw and rotate polygons, triangles and quadrilaterals, determine area of two-dimensional shapes, understand probability, find points on a graph, and observe coordinate graphs and transformations.

    This Course provides the background to use calculus in sciences, social sciences, and business applications. This course also provides an excellent foundation for further work in calculus. The instructional approach emphasizes both applications and the theoretical basis of calculus. Enrollment subject to seat availability.
    Prerequisite – Pre-Calculus
    Available Sections: Honors, CP

    This course is a bridge to prepare for college-level math courses. Using topics from Geometry, Algebra 1, and SAT preparations, extend their learning through real world applications of algebraic, geometric, and statistical concepts. The course includes a review of the families of functions (linear, exponential, and quadratic), measures of central tendency, standard deviation, probability, combinations, permutations, properties of polygons, area and perimeter of two-dimensional figures, surface area and volume of three-dimensional figures, algebraic and geometric transformations, and right triangle trigonometry.

    This course emphasizes making connections within the concept of plane geometry. Students are introduced to inductive and deductive reasoning, logic and proof including two column proofs, thinking logically and precisely, the basic principles of plane and coordinate geometry, development of problem solving skills, and full integration of algebra and geometry. Additionally, this course prepares students for more advanced work in mathematics in other high school and college courses.

    Available Sections: Honors, CP

    This course is the first of two year-long courses in the alternative Algebra 1 sequence. Focus is  primarily on linear relationships, with an emphasis on the algebraic manipulation of linear expressions, equations, and inequalities, as well as graphing and modeling with linear functions. 

     This course focuses on building number concepts and problem-solving skills in mathematics. Topics covered in this course include: addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, factors, primes and composites, common factors and number patterns, and the concept of fractions. These topics are expanded upon by learning how to work with data, find connections to measurement, geometry, and rates, determine area and perimeter, define properties of shapes, observe geometric transformations, and introduce statistics.

    This course helps prepare students for the financial challenges they will face in life after high school. Topics covered include the concept of “financial health” which compares the discipline required to maintain financial health to the discipline required to keep physically healthy, budgeting, and banking. The course ends with the “real world” calculator. Students have the opportunity to interact with a hypothetical post-graduation budget based on actual starting salary data for over 40 professional fields.

    This course reinforces and extends the topics covered in Algebra 2 and provides an introduction to Trigonometry. Topics covered include equations and inequalities, functions and their graphs, polynomials, rational functions and expressions, radicals, exponential and logarithmic functions. Trigonometric topics covered include the definitions and graphs of the trig functions, identities and equations, and practical applications.

    Pre-Requisite – Algebra 2
    Available Sections: Honors, CP

    Electives

    In this hands-on, project-based class, dive into construction and architectural design in a way that keeps human carbon footprints small by using environmentally sustainable practices. Explore dimensioning, measuring, and design by building scale model homes and using a 3D architectural design software. 
    Associated IA Pathway: Architecture & Construction

    This semester-long course is designed for students who are interested in or challenged by puzzles and mathematical problems. Throughout the course, students will use the familiar operations as the starting point of intriguing investigations into a variety of math and logic puzzles.

    This course introduces the concepts of probability. Topics include randomness, theoretical and experimental probability, probability rules, counting rules, distributions, and calculating expected values. Students will develop analytical skills through interpreting data and making connections with actual events. This course pairs well with Statistics . It may be taken before, after, or independently of Statistics. 
    Enrollment subject to seat availability.

    This course introduces the concepts and methods of statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics of categorical and quantitative data, the normal model, scatter plots, data collection, and an introduction to inference. Students will develop analytical skills through interpreting data and making connections with actual events. Enrollment subject to seat availability.

  • Department Requirement: Students are required to complete 3.0 credits in Science, to include 1 course in Biology, during grades 9-12. Students are placed in appropriate courses by their guidance counselor. Courses marked (*) meet the Biology requirement for this department.

    Core Classes

    This course is the equivalent of a one-semester college-level science course, designed for students who have an interest in biology/environmental themes. This multi-disciplinary course applies scientific concepts to real world problems and dilemmas. Course topics include traditional and experimental ecology, types of pollution, energy sources, oceanography, global trends, economics, ethics, and sustainability.

    This Pennsylvania Keystone aligned course examines the concepts and processes of life science. Topics include cell chemistry and function, heredity, evolutionary theory and ecology. All topics will focus on the principles that govern biological processes observed in the natural world. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the physically proctored Pennsylvania Biology Keystone exam at the conclusion of the course.

    Available Sections:  Honors, CP, Career

    Learn about matter, its chemical structure and properties, and the changes it undergoes. Topics include atomic structure, stoichiometry, solutions, gas laws, periodic law, bonding, molecular orbital theory, equilibrium, acids, and bases.
    Available Sections: Honors, CP, Career

    Explore the complex interactions between living organisms and their non-living environments as well as current environmental concerns and strategies for conservation and preservation. Examine the vital role that humans play in the global ecosystem. All topics focus on the scientific principles that govern ecological processes that can be observed in the natural world.

    This course emphasizes the development of basic scientific skills and concepts in chemistry, physics, earth science, and biology. In addition, scientific vocabulary and reading comprehension is addressed to assist students in furthering their science education. 

    This course introduces students to fundamental biological principles. Students learn about the chemistry of life, the basics of cells and cell processes, genetics, and ecology. Students discover how other scientific fields, such as chemistry, play an important role in the functions of life.

    Physics is an important, relevant, and enjoyable discipline which includes the topics of mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and optics. In the various levels of this science course, students learn by doing, experiencing practical applications as well as theoretical aspects of the discipline. Students gain an understanding of how Physics applies to everyday life while preparing for the challenges of science at the college level.

    Available Sections: Honors, CP

    Electives

    Investigate the study of anatomical structures, physiological systems, and body functions. Using craft items and recycled materials, engage in hands-on STEAM-based projects, review human structural and functional organization at both the microscopic and macroscopic levels. Units include discussions of the basic body systems, including the musculoskeletal, circulatory, nervous, and integumentary systems. The course also includes the study of recent advances in medical technology such as 3D printed bones and organs.

     Explore nature's fury, and how we respond to, learn from, and try to prepare for the next disaster. From tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes and tsunamis, to avalanches and lightning storms, discover what causes these natural phenomena and how we are trying to prevent casualties and damage from future events. As Murphy has expressed so eloquently in his own “law,” if something can go wrong, it will. One thing we know for sure - it’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when.

    This course surveys key topics in forensic science, including the application of the scientific process to forensic analysis, procedures and principles of crime scene investigation, physical and trace evidence, and the law and courtroom procedures from the perspective of the forensic scientist. Through online lessons, 
    virtual and hands-on labs, and analysis of fictional crime scenarios, students learn about 
    forensic tools, technical resources, forming and testing hypotheses, proper data collection, and responsible conclusions. Enrollment subject to seat availability.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least two years of high school science including Biology and Chemistry.

    Explore our solar system and beyond its limits to experience how we play a part in the universe around us. Observe stars and breakdown what makes them hot and bright. Answer the questions: How do we observe galaxies far away? What are old and new ways of exploring space? Apply critical thinking and discovery to the expanding universe and the objects that make it up. Learning about astronomy is cool, but learning about Supernovae is a blast.

  • Department Requirement: Students are required to complete 3.0 credits in Social Studies, to include 1 course in Civics (or Government) during grades 9-12. Students are placed in appropriate courses by their guidance counselor. Courses marked (*) meet the Civics requirement for this department.

    Core Classes

    This course is designed to help students become active, productive citizens of the U.S. Throughout the course, students learn what government is, how the American government functions, and what they can do to become an ideal citizen of the U.S. Topics covered include a study of citizenship and the American government.

    Available Sections: Honors, CP, Career

    This course is equivalent to a one-semester college level social studies course. Analyze the United States government and explore economic theory and practice. Examine the underpinnings of the U.S. Constitution, and begin to interpret and apply the Constitution to governmental policy. Develop an understanding of the principles and processes of formal institutions and informal institutions. Develop an understanding of economic indicators and the role 
    of government in economic decision-making. Examine civil liberties and public policy from both a legal/theoretical and a practical perspective. The course emphasizes the importance of civic life and the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. 

    Study a time period that begins in the early 1500s and continues to the present day including the events, people, conflicts, and ideas that have shaped our modern world. Develop an understanding of modern world history by studying topics such as the Renaissance, exploration, colonization, revolutions, WWI, WWII, and the Cold War. 

    Available Sections: Honors, CP, Career

    Investigate the events that occurred in the United States as well as those that impacted the United States during the 1800s through the 1970s. Throughout the course, students explore major events that shaped the future decades and generations of the United States, its allies, and also its enemies. The course highlights the accomplishments and challenges of minorities throughout these periods and their contributions to the development of American history. Learn how to assess historical materials and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented.
    Available Sections: Honors, CP, Career

    Be a "World Traveler!"  Explore the different elements geography and locations around the world. Study the physical and cultural characteristics of these places while learning about the current problems they face. Current events and other ideas will be discussed. 

    Electives

    Using primary sources and firsthand accounts, this semester-long course will present an in-depth look at black history in the United States, from enslavement through the Civil Rights Movement. Learn about the changing social, political, and economic discrimination African Americans faced from slavery, through the Jim Crow era, and during the Civil Rights Movement. Emphasis is also placed on the achievements and contributions African Americans have made to the United States. Gain a better understanding of current events by studying the past.

    How do businesses make money? This course provides students with the fundamental tools for economic thinking. Students examine decision-making by consumers and producers and analyze supply and demand, pricing and production, and providing goods and services. By the end of this course, students will create their very own business plan.

    How does one become a lawyer or work in criminal justice? How does law and justice work? Explore the many different areas of the criminal justice system, from crimes and courts to how society addresses different issues related to them. Participate in activities related to the criminal justice system to gain real world knowledge and experience of law and justice.

    How does the brain work? Why do we feel happy or sad? Psychology seeks to explain those things and more. In this full-year elective course, learn about and discuss the basics of psychology and the study of it. Explore how the brain works and thinks, why we feel and act the way we do, and much more.

    Study the important roles that women played in American History from the pre-colonial era up until the present day. Key topics include the contributions of women before and during the Revolutionary War, the abolitionist, suffrage, civil rights, and feminist movements, as well as key pieces of legislation, particularly those obtained during the 1970s. Current issues are also examined.

  • Department Requirement: This department allows students to explore who they are, what is important to them, and what they would like to do. These classes allow students to develop the tools they need to create the kind of life they want. Classes marked (*) meet the Career and College Readiness requirement for this department.

    These courses introduce students to the building blocks necessary to select and prepare for a career. Students explore their interests and abilities, identify career options, and work to develop a high school and college/career plan. Various topics are introduced, including effective speaking and listening skills, cover letters and resumes, and social networking. Students will also create a career portfolio.

    This course provides students with a solid foundation to a successful future beyond high school. Students will continue to explore their interests and abilities, identify career options, and work to develop a college/career plan. Topics will include interviewing skills, completing job-related paperwork such as tax forms, planning for SAT/ACT exams and college applications, and skills needed to become a successful adult.

    The graduation project is the culmination of knowledge, skills, and experience achieved throughout a student’s high school career. The complete project will be presented to the Graduation Project Advisor who will ensure that all specific project requirements have been completed as mandated by the state and assign a presentation date. The graduation project must be completed in order to fulfill student graduation requirements. Students entering grades 10 and 11 may choose to complete their Graduation Project requirement by doing a career-based project. Completing the career-based project in 10th or 11th grade will mean not having to take the Graduation Project 12 course to complete it during the senior year.

    The graduation project is the culmination of knowledge, skills, and experience achieved throughout a student’s high school career. The complete project will be presented to the Graduation Project Advisor who will ensure that all specific project requirements have been completed as mandated by the state and assign a presentation date. The graduation project must be completed in order to fulfill student graduation requirements.

  • Department Requirement: Students are required to complete 2 credits in Arts and Humanities during grades 9-12.

    Learn about the best ways to communicate in our digital world in order to share their thoughts and ideas. Explore some of the most popular types of writing such as narrative and argumentative. Students will have opportunities to respond using a variety of online media, such as blogs, forums, discussion boards, and images.

    Music created in the United States tells an interesting story of our country. Students will learn about music in the early days of America and travel through time exploring many different genres. The course will focus mainly on jazz and rock and roll, but will also investigate the blues, musical theater, film scores, and the music of today. 

    Learn how to draw using elements and principles of design. Students will learn about art history and a variety of approaches to drawing. Form and value will be discovered using gesture and contour drawing, value studies of 3D forms, and still life paintings. Students will explore composition and figure/portrait development.

    Use the elements and principals of design to create an assortment of art projects. Projects will be based on various periods from art history including Surrealism, pop art, and cultural art studies. Projects aim to help develop individual self-expression and style. 

    Prerequisite – Art 1

    Explore several body systems and this knowledge will be the starting point for STEAM focused projects that use creativity and creative thinking skills. Complete activities that are hands-on and based on the human body. Collect and analyze  experimental data to present as graphics. Create various art projects in relationship to the content and learn anatomical structures through coloring book activities.

    Studying children helps an individual understand the importance of personal development, the developmental processes of children, and careers in the childcare/educational field. By understanding how a child develops intellectually, socially, emotionally, and physically, students are empowered to make choices for themselves and others to optimize their quality of life. Students taking this course will also learn about the role of a parent and how to build self-esteem within the family.

    In this writing-intensive course, explore the major genres of writing, including nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. Through lessons, class discussions, and selected readings, learn about the elements of good writing. Build a variety of writing techniques and skills through both short- and long-term writing assignments.

    Begin to master the concepts, design principles, skill sets and techniques of photography. Learn about the capabilities and functions of the camera, dissect art elements and principles, and explore each one closely to understand photographic composition. Learn how to edit and manipulate photographic images.
    Associated IA Pathways: Fine Arts, Digital Graphic Arts

    Explore information and skills needed to function effectively within the family as well as a changing, complex society. Classes will delve into topics such as meal planning, grocery shopping, and dietary modifications.  Focus on financial concepts and making informed decisions when it comes to savings and debt. Become familiarize themselves with checking/savings accounts, interest, credit/debt, and the importance of a budget. 

    Explore the basics of combining text with images to create artwork for advertisements or book and album covers. Review advertising techniques and the power of visual communication.
    Associated IA Pathways: Fine Arts, Digital Graphic Arts, AV Communication Arts 

    This asynchronous course will look at fictional and non-fictional storytelling techniques, both written and visual, as well as how this genre influences modern media. Works will include memoirs, interpretative history, and more conventional fiction.

    Work collaboratively with teachers to design projects that are independently approved and relate to Art. Student evaluations will be conducted by the teacher upon completion of the course to determine whether course goals and objectives were met and award credit.

    Work collaboratively with teachers to design projects that are independently approved and relate to Family and Consumer Sciences. Student evaluations will be conducted by the teacher upon completion of the course to determine whether course goals and objectives were met and award credit.

    Work collaboratively with teachers to design projects that are independently approved and relate to Music. Student evaluations will be conducted by the teacher upon completion of the course to determine whether course goals and objectives were met and award credit.

    This asynchronous course will allow students to showcase their talents which they have been pursuing outside of school. These talents can include, but are not limited to artistic forms of expression such as music, dance, painting, cooking, cosmetology, jewelry making, etc.

    Drawing is a fundamental form of art that is used in all mediums.  This course is an introduction to the basic foundation of both design and realistic drawing. Learn the elements of drawing: line, tone, color, texture, composition and space, while exploring drawing materials such as charcoal, graphite, Conté, pastels, and ink. Develop creativity through the presentation of basic techniques. Work from observation to address topics such as proportion, perspective, color theory, light and shade. Receive exposure to critique skills and build a final portfolio.  Prerequisite: Art 1

    Explore the artistic expression of watercolors. Starting with the basics and working through experimentation pieces, build a personal style with a watercolor portfolio. Prerequisite: Art 1

    This course is designed to expose students to the elements of music and the primary musical periods of traditional Western European classical music as well as World Music. Learn the basics of music reading, study a variety of composers and musicians, and listen to a variety of musical examples. Experience the music of many different cultures around the world.

    How does the brain work? Why do we feel happy or sad? Psychology seeks to explain those things and more. In this full-year elective course, learn about and discuss the basics of psychology and the study of it. Explore how the brain works and thinks, why we feel and act the way we do, and much more.

    In LearnKey’s Photoshop CC course learn to edit and retouch photos as well as create digital images and designs. Learn digital image formats, basic color theory, and how to retouch and apply other tonal adjustments to images. Explore editing tools through various projects while preparing for the Visual Communication Using Adobe Photoshop ACA exam.
    Prerequisites- Art 1, Digital Photography or Graphic Design 

    This course is a literature course exploring the relationship between print and screen, using literary criticism to examine authors’ purpose in narrative and the cultural interpretation as it is transformed into an alternative media.

  • Department Requirement: Students are required to complete 1.0 credit in Health/Physical Education, to include Health (Wellness) and a PE course to be taken each school year. Physical Education courses do not need to be taken consecutively.

    Core Classes

    Apply the skill of developing a workout routine and explore how to improve current fitness levels. Students will complete a fitness test and log their progress towards their individual fitness goal.

    Studies show that regular physical activity is essential to good health and wellness. In this introductory course, students  practice the ten health skills: communication, refusal skills, conflict resolution, accessing information, analyzing influences, practicing healthful behaviors, stress management, decision making, advocacy, and goal setting. Students learn basic fitness terminology as well as how physical activity benefits both the body and mind.

    Students continue to practice the ten health skills: communication, refusal skills, conflict resolution, accessing information, analyzing influences, practicing healthful behaviors, stress management, decision making, advocacy, and goal setting. Students learn basic fitness terminology as well as how physical activity benefits both the body and mind.

    Students work collaboratively with teachers to design projects that are independently approved and relate to Physical Education. Evaluations are conducted by the teacher upon completion of the class to determine whether class goals and objectives were met and award credit.

    Learn to make informed decisions that will assist them both now and in the future. Course work has been developed using scientific evidence that has shown regular physical activity is essential to good health and wellness. Learn basic fitness terminology as well as how physical activity benefits both the body and mind. Research and choose fitness activities that promote lifelong participation.

    Practice making informed health and fitness decisions that will show benefit now and in the future. Review basic fitness terminology and benefits. Begin to design a personalized fitness program. Many assignments in this course are based upon research from the American Heart Association indicating that the primary cause of death in the United States, heart disease, can be treated with daily participation in physical activity.

    Electives

    This course is designed to give students an overview of the skills required in first aid and CPR/AED. It will not certify students in these areas, but it will help prepare them for the certification exams through American 

    In this course, students will complete a variety of scenarios pertaining to emergency situations in order to show mastery of previously learned First Aid and CPR skills.
    Prerequisite - Students must be certified in First Aid and CPR/AED through American Red Cross.

    Learn a variety of different styles of Yoga, as well as keep a journal of different poses practiced. Students are provided with a Yoga starter kit (if needed) and are responsible for uploading pictures of themselves practicing Yoga.

  • Innovation Career Academy is a collection of pathways that provide valuable skills in a STEAM related career. There is opportunity to take multiple courses in a specific pathway or to sample different courses in different pathways to explore different STEAM interests. All students are encouraged to try different courses in the Innovation Academy to help guide them towards a future career interest. The Innovation Career Academy Pathways are:                                                                      Advanced Engineering, Architecture and Construction, Audio Visual Communication Arts, Biomedical, Computer Science, Digital Graphic Arts, Drone Innovators, Engineering, Entrepreneurship, Fine Arts, Information Technology, Programming, and Robotics.


    Innovation Career Academy Courses

    Take design to the next level and make creations come to life. Explore 3D design and learn to create in the third dimension using the 3D CAD program SketchUp. This is a hands-on class. Materials needed for projects are mailed to students. Student designed projects are printed on the AHCCS 3D printer and shipped directly to students. Come explore the possibilities.     Associated Pathways: Engineering, Architecture & Construction, Robotics  

    Investigate the study of anatomical structures, physiological systems, and body functions. Using craft items and recycled materials, engage in hands-on STEAM-based projects. Review human structural and functional organization at both the microscopic and macroscopic levels. Units include discussions of the basic body systems, including the musculoskeletal, circulatory, nervous, and integumentary systems. The course also includes the study of recent advances in medical technology such as 3D printed bones and organs.  Associated Pathway: Biomedical

    This course is equivalent to a first-semester, college-level course in computer science. It introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization  of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes both object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design using Java language. Associated Pathway: Computer Science

    This course is equivalent to a first-semester, college-level computing course.  Students will cultivate their understanding of computer science. They will be working with data and information, collaborating to solve problems, and developing computer programs as they explore concepts like creativity, abstraction, data and information, algorithms, programming, the internet, and the global impact of computing. Associated Pathway: Computer Science

    Learn how to draw using elements and principles of design. Discover art history and a variety of approaches to drawing. Discover form and value using gesture and contour drawing, value studies of 3D forms, and still life paintings. Explore composition and figure and portrait development.
    Associated Pathways: Fine Arts, Digital Graphic Arts

    Create a variety of art projects using the elements and principles of design. Projects are based on various periods from art history including Surrealism, pop art, and cultural art studies. Projects aim to help develop individual self-expression and style. Prerequisite: Art 1. Associated Pathways: Fine Arts, Digital Graphic Arts

    Explore several body systems and use this knowledge as the the starting point for STEAM focused projects that use creativity and creative thinking skills. Complete activities that are hands-on and based on the human body. Collect and analyze experimental data to present as graphics. Create various art projects in relationship to the content and learn anatomical structures through coloring book activities. Associated Pathway: Biomedical, Fine Arts  

    Learn about construction and architectural design with both residential and commercial projects. Create designs using the 3D architectural design software Autodesk Revit and have the opportunity to get earn professional certification for the 3D design software. Prerequisites: Green Architecture or Introduction to Engineering Design. Associated Pathways: Advanced Engineering, Architecture & Construction 

    Create and build projects. Discover the design process and develop an understanding of the influence of creativity and innovation in our lives. Apply new techniques to solve challenging real-world problems by designing prototypes. Associated Pathways: Engineering, Architecture & Construction  

    Learn techniques to format text and/or video to enhance their intended meaning. Complete a full cycle of the writing process, resulting in a published work in the form of a personal blog, podcast, or YouTube video after choosing from a list of teacher-approved projects such as a top 10 list, book, movie, game or TV show review, current event, opinion or editorial, memoir, or creative storytelling. Associated Pathway: AV Communication Arts

    Begin to master the concepts, design principles, skill sets and techniques of photography. Learn about the capabilities and functions of the camera, dissect art elements and principles, and explore each one closely to understand photographic composition. Learn how to edit and manipulate photographic images. Associated Pathway: Fine Arts, Digital Graphic Arts  

    This course is designed to give students an overview of the skills in first aid and CPR/AED. It will not provide certification in these areas, but it will help prepare for the certification exams through American Red Cross. Associated Pathway: Biomedical

    Explore the basics of combining text with images to create  artwork for advertisements or book and album covers. Review advertising techniques and the power of visual communication. Associated Pathways: Fine Arts, Digital Graphic Arts, AV Communication Arts  

    In this hands-on, project-based class, dive into construction and architectural design in a way that keeps human carbon footprints small by using environmentally sustainable practices. Explore dimensioning, measuring, and design by building scale model homes and using a 3D architectural design software. Associated Pathway: Architecture and Construction

    Gain  an overview of computing fundamentals, applications, and communications & networks, and prepare to take the IC3 certification exam. IC3 Global Standard exam objectives are aligned with today’s most current technologies and relevant digital literacy requirements, including social media, collaboration, and cloud computing concepts. The GS4 certification comprises three individual exams and is designed to validate competency in three key areas: computing fundamentals, living online, and key applications. Associated Pathway: Computer Science 

    Drawing is a fundamental form of art that is used in all mediums.  This course is an introduction to the basic foundation of both design and realistic drawing. Learn the elements of drawing: line, tone, color, texture, composition and space, while exploring drawing materials such as charcoal, graphite, Conté, pastels, and ink. Develop creativity through the presentation of basic techniques. Work from observation to address topics such as proportion, perspective, color theory, light and shade. Receive exposure to critique skills and build a final portfolio. Prerequisite: Art 1.  Associated Pathways: Fine Arts  

    Alongside HTML and CSS, JavaScript is one of the core technologies of the World Wide Web. It enables interactive web pages and is an essential part of web applications. Click a button and get a response: it is probably JavaScript that made that happen. Join the class to learn the fundamentals of this programming language including the use of timers and animation.   Associated Pathway: Programming  

    The first step to coding a robot's moves, creating a virtual reality video game, or even programming NASAs space shuttles is learning Python. This is a coding language that is used in many of the newest technologies of today. This entry level course will open a world of opportunities and give the programming foundation needed to take the Raspberry Pi robotics courses. Ready for the challenge? Associated Pathways: Engineering, Robotics

    Explore the artistic expression of watercolors. Starting with the basics and working through experimentation pieces,build a personal style with a watercolor portfolio. Prerequisites: Art 1 Associated Pathway: Fine Arts 

    Microsoft Office Basics: Learn the basics skills of Microsoft Office products, including Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and Outlook, and important skills such as creating documents, presentations, spreadsheets, and the effective use of e-mail.

    Microsoft IT Academy Excel: Explore the essentials of creating spreadsheets. Topics covered include: creating and saving workbooks, creating and managing large workbooks, tables, and charts, using formulas and basic functions and formatting text, and sharing and protecting spreadsheets and working with templates.

     Microsoft IT Academy PowerPoint: Discover how to create and edit presentations. Topics include: inserting and modifying clip art, formatting and proofing presentation text, and creating a custom layout for slides.  

    Microsoft IT Academy Word:Gain knowledge of the essentials of Microsoft Word. Topics covered include: creating, navigating, and saving documents, checking spelling and grammar, adding graphics and clip art and inserting hyperlinks and WordArt, and working with outlines, columns, tables, diagrams, and drawing tools.           
    Associated Pathway: Computer Science

    In LearnKey’s Photoshop CC course learn how to edit and retouch photos as well as create digital images and designs. Learn digital image formats, basic color theory, and how to retouch and apply other tonal adjustments to images. Explore editing tools through various projects while preparing for the Visual Communication Using Adobe Photoshop ACA exam. Prerequisites: Art 1, Digital Photography or Graphic Design. Associated Pathways: Digital Graphic Arts

    Not just for future engineers, this is a certified Project Lead The Way course. Solve real-world problems by designing prototypes as well as strengthen creative and innovative problem-solving skills that will open their minds to a world of possibilities. Design in 3D using Autodesk Inventor software and have the opportunity to earn professional certification in Autodesk Inventor. Prerequisites: Design & Modeling and 3D Printing or Guidance Counselor Approval. Associated Pathways: Advanced Engineering, Engineering   

    Dig deeper into the Python programming language and project-based learning and have the chance to design and build race cars, robotic arms and more. This is a continuation of the Intro to Python course. Associated Pathways: Engineering, Robotics

    Schoolyard Ventures is an innovative program that helps teens launch businesses, non-profits and other real-world projects that are meaningful to them. The Entrepreneurship Boot Camp gives students an introduction to the program and helps them develop ideas for starting their own business.

    Schoolyard Ventures provides students with curriculum, workshops, mentorship, and micro-capital to help them launch their own businesses. Students are encouraged to experiment with various business ideas and progress through the program at their own pace. Instructors and mentors help with this process as students work to bring their product to market. Prerequisite - Schoolyard Ventures Entrepreneurship Boot Camp 

    Careers opportunities in drone technology are expanding.  Become immersed in virtual search and rescue missions performed by drones. Learn how drone SAR teams operate to get the job done. Search and rescue is just one of many ways drones will change how the world operates. Soon inspections, construction, law enforcement, agriculture, and more will all be assisted by drones. Learn about drones, autonomous flight, and the foundations of the FAA Part 107 Remote Pilot Exam. The instructor travels to a variety of locations around the state to provide an opportunity to fly a DJI drone. Associated Pathway: Drone Innovators  

    In part 2 of Search and Rescue by Drone, the SAR missions become trickier. How are missions completed with drone flight safety regulations, FAA flight standards, flight principles, & drone design in mind? This course emphasizes drone flight safety and the law. FAA Part 107 Remote Pilot Exam safety and legal questions are discussed. The instructor travels to a variety of locations around the state to provide an opportunity to fly a DJI drone. Prerequisite: Search and Rescue (SAR) by Drone, Part 1Associated Pathway: Drone Innovators

    Master the basic skills needed in today’s digital learning environment. Learn uploading and downloading of documents, basics of Internet safety, copyright respect, acceptable use policy, keyboarding, and basic word processing skills. Associated Pathway: Computer Science

    Discover basic web design using HTML and CSS. Create basic web pages and enhance them using text formatting, color, graphics, images, and multimedia. Associated Pathway: Programming

  • Department Requirement: This program is designed to allow students to earn elective credit for participating in a weekly paid position or a non-paid internship. Students with an Individualized Educational Program should contact their Learning Support teacher for alternative eligibility, pre-requisites, and requirements.

    This course will provide students a framework with which to develop their work and career readiness skills. Students who have found paid employment, and who can work a minimum of 60 hours per 9 week quarterly period, will have the opportunity to earn 0.5 credits per quarter. Students will be responsible for weekly check-ins with their teacher (to include adequate progress on their quarterly grade sheet), criteria based on a quarterly assessment (rubric will be provided), and a final presentation of their experience. Students must maintain a passing GPA in their core classes and appropriate school attendance, quarterly, to be eligible to remain in the program for the next quarterly period.

    Pre-Requisite: Students must be in the 10th grade or 16 years of age.

  • Courses offered by AHCCS

    In this independent study class, students will be provided with all the information needed to earn their driver's license. Interactive lessons are used to examine up-to-date safe-driving techniques. Students who take this class will enjoy an effective, high-quality driver's education class that will teach them everything they need to know to become safe, confident drivers. The 24/7 online access is perfect for those students who may not have the time to attend traditional driver's education classes. Students must be at least 15 years old.

    Complete class description can be found in the Arts And Humanities section.

    Complete class description can be found in the Arts and Humanities section.

    In this course, students will complete a variety of scenarios pertaining to emergency situations in order to show mastery of previously learned First Aid and CPR skills. Prerequisite - Students must be certified in First Aid and CPR/AED through American Red Cross

    Complete class description can be found in the Arts and Humanities section.

    Complete class description can be found in the Physical Education Department section.

    This asynchronous course will allow students to showcase their talents which they have been doing outside of school. These talents can include, but are not limited to artistic forms of expression such as music, dance, painting, cooking, cosmetology, jewelry making, etc.

    Third-Party Courses

    AHCCS offers its AP courses through FLVS, which is an online school dedicated to personalized learning. They offer dedicated, certified teachers, while AHCCS teachers are on hand to provide support as needed.
    • AP Calculus AB
    • AP Calculus BC
    • AP Environmental Science
    • AP English Language and Composition
    • AP English Literature and Composition
    • AP Statistics
    • AP U.S. Government and Politics

    AHCCS joins more than 20,000 schools and districts around the world that have integrated Rosetta Stone Solutions into their curriculum to support the growing need for language skills. The Dynamic Immersion® method used within this program allows student to engage with the language through images, repetition, and scaffolding without need of English-to-Language translating. Rosetta Stone also offers ease of learning through a mobile application for students on the go. A school facilitator will oversee the students’ progress in this self-paced online course, as well as grade assignments, and help keep students on track to complete their language level in a timely manner. Students must have at least a B in all courses and receive approval from their guidance counselor in order to enroll in an independent language course. Each language typically has 3-5 levels of study available. Completion of a level is equal to one academic credit. The following languages are offered through Rosetta Stone Solutions. Please contact your school counselor if you are interested in taking a language that is not listed below. 

    • Arabic
    • Mandarin Chinese
    • French
    • German
    • Greek
    • Hebrew
    • Italian
    • Japanese
    • Korean
    • Latin
    • Spanish

AP and Honors Courses
Our Advanced Placement (AP) courses are college level courses taught according to syllabi prescribed by The College Board Advanced Placement Program and/or to courses designed to prepare students for College Board AP Tests. Success in AP courses can be an important factor in admission to colleges and universities. Successful performance on AP Tests (a score of 3, 4, or 5 on a 5-point scale) may lead to college credit and/or advanced placement in college courses. AP courses receive appropriate weight when the Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated.

Honors courses allow students to explore topics in greater depth than non-honors courses. Honors students will complete projects that enrich their understanding of topics and the links between them. Honors level courses are listed as such on the students’ transcripts.


Graduation Requirements
Students must successfully complete 21.0 cumulative credits in grades 9-12 as follows:

  • 4.0 credits in English to include 1 course in Literature and an English course to be taken each school year
  • 3.0 credits in Mathematics to include 1 course in Algebra
  • 3.0 credits in Science to include 1 course in Biology
  • 3.0 credits in Social Studies to include 1 course in Civics (or Government)
  • 1.0 credit in Health and Physical Education, to include Health (Wellness), and a PE course to be taken each school year
  • 2.0 credits in Arts and Humanities
  • 5.0 credits in electives to include 0.25 credits in Graduation Project. Any course that has not been counted to fulfill other graduation requirements as indicated in this site shall also satisfy this requirement. Two credits in the Innovation Academy are highly encouraged, but not required.
  • 21.0 total credits